Classic Car Show

Cruise into Historic Cold Spring Village for the Annual Classic and Antique Car Show! Cars will be on display Saturday from 10am-3pm and Sunday 10am-2:45p.  See beautifully restored and preserved vehicles, from muscle cars to light trucks, from the 1910s to the 1980s parked along the Village’s tree-lined, shell-paved lanes. Talk with the owners and learn about the process of restoring a classic automobile as well as the fascinating stories behind their development and use.  Registration for car owners begins at 8am.
The Village’s historic buildings will be open during regular museum hours, 10am-4:30pm, with historically clothed interpreters teaching guests about the crafts, trades and lifestyles of Early America.
The Classic Car Show is sponsored by:
The registration for the car show is $15.00 payable to the operator of the show. On Saturday, members of the Jersey Cape Region of the Antique Automobile Club of America will show their antique vehicles, while hot rods and other classics will be presented on Sunday with 609 Performance organizing the show. You may enter each day. Saturday is entitling driver and one guest admission to Historic Cold Spring Village. Additional passengers may purchase discounted admission tickets at the same time. Registration is in operation from 8 to 9:45. Historic Cold Spring Village is open to the public as of 10:00 am and cars should be in place by that time. You are encouraged to bring chairs. Bakery, Ice Cream Parlor, Eatery, Cold Spring Grange and Cold Spring Brewery are available for food and beverages.

Winners from Saturday’s Show

Best in show Mike Stettler 57 Chevy Bel Air

Prewar is Al Brannen 1934 Ford Cabriolet

Post War is Dave Feidler 1946 Chevy pick up

Hot rod David Hickman 23 Ford HIboy

Drivers Choice -George McClure with a 57 Chevy 210 two-door

Show the gate staff a picture of this coupon and receive $2.00 off your admission price! Offer good until August 4th! Only one coupon per family, please.

To sponsor this event click here

Down on the Farm Weekend

Experience life on an Early American farm through hands-on activities and exhibits at Historic Cold Spring Village’s ‘Down on the Farm’ Weekend, Saturday and Sunday, August 10-11 from 10am-4:30pm. Historic Cold Spring Village, an open-air living history museum, presents the trades, crafts, architecture, and lifestyles of an Early American, rural South Jersey farming community. The Village is also home to a working 8-acre heritage farm complex.
Special exhibits throughout the Village will include collections of antique and modern farming equipment and tools. Visitors can tour the historic Corson-Gandy Barn, c. 1880, which is now home to Levi the Village horse. Guests can visit the Village sheep, pigs, chickens and calves. The Family Activity Area will feature games and take-home crafts. Children may also participate in farm chores at the Corson-Gandy Barn throughout the day.
This event sponsored by: Smeltzer & Sons Feed & Pet Supply
To sponsor this event click here
8th Annual Dog Show on Saturday, August 10!
Registration $4.00 per dog and $2.00 for one handler at 10-10:45a at the Route 9 & 626 entrances.
Judging begins at 11:30am at Village Gazebo.
Dogs must be leashed.
Owners are responsible for dog behavior & clean up.

THIS JUST OUT!

The Vintage Baseball Double Header starting at noon Saturday 8/10/2019- Behind Corson Gandy Barn!!!!
Lewes Baseball Club of Lewes, DE vs the Monmouth Furnace BBC of Monmouth NJ
HAS BEEN CANCELED.
We sincerely apologize for the inconvenience.

Sec. 1. The ball must weigh not less than five and one-half, nor more than five and three-fourths ounces, avoirdupois. It must measure not less than nine and one-half, nor more than nine and three-fourths inches in circumference. It must be composed of india-rubber and yarn, and covered with leather, and, in all match games, shall be furnished by the challenging club, and become the property of the winning club, as a trophy of victory.

Sec. 2. The bat must be round, and must not exceed two and a half inches in diameter in the thickest part. It must be made of wood and may be of any length to suit the striker.

Sec. 3. The bases must be four in number, placed at equal distances from each other, and securely fastened upon the four corners of a square, whose sides are respectively thirty yards. They must be so constructed as to be distinctly seen by the umpire and must cover a space equal to one square foot of surface. The first, second, and third bases shall be canvas bags, painted white, and filled with sand or sawdust; the home base and pitcher’s point to be each marked by a flat circular iron plate, painted or enameled white.

Sec. 4. The base from which the ball is struck shall be designated the Home Base, and must be directly opposite to the second base; the first base must always be that upon the right hand, and the third base that upon the left-hand side of the striker, when occupying his position at the Home Base. And in all match games, a line connecting the home and first base and the home and third base, shall be marked by the use of chalk, or other suitable material, so as to be distinctly seen by the umpire.

Sec. 5. The pitcher’s position shall be designated by two lines four yards in length, drawn at right angles to a line from home to the second base, having its center upon that line, at two fixed iron plates, placed at points fifteen and sixteen yards distant from the home base. The pitcher must stand within the lines, and must deliver the ball as near as possible over the center of the home base, and for the striker.

Sec. 6. Should the pitcher repeatedly fail to deliver to the striker fair balls, for the apparent purpose of delaying the game, or for any other cause, the umpire, after warning him, shall call one ball, and if the pitcher persists in such action, two and three balls; when three balls shall have been called, the striker shall be entitled to the first base; and should any base be occupied at that time, each player occupying them shall be entitled to one base without being put out.

Sec. 7. The ball must be pitched, not jerked nor thrown to the bat; and whenever the pitcher draws back his hand, or moves with the apparent purpose or pretension to deliver the ball, he shall so deliver it, and he must have neither foot in advance of the front line or off the ground at the time of delivering the ball; and if he fails in either of these particulars, then it shall be declared a baulk.

Sec. 8. When baulk is made by the pitcher, every player running the bases is entitled to one base, without being put out.

Sec. 9. If the ball, from a stroke of the bat, first touches the ground, the person of a player or any other object behind the range of home and the first base, or home and the third base, it shall be termed foul, and must be so declared by the umpire, unasked. If the ball first touches the ground, either upon or in front of the range of those bases, it shall be considered fair.

Sec. 10. A player making the home base shall be entitled to score one run.

Sec. 11. If three balls are struck at and missed, and the last one is not caught, either flying or upon the first bound, it shall be considered fair, and the striker must attempt to make his run.

Sec. 12. The striker is out if a foul ball is caught, either before touching the ground or upon the first bound.

Sec. 13. Or, if three balls are struck at and missed, and the last is caught, either before touching the ground or upon the first bound;

Sec. 14. Or, if a fair ball is struck, and the ball is caught either without having touched the ground or upon the first bound;

Sec. 15. Or, if a fair ball is struck, and the ball is held by an adversary on the first base before the striker touches that base.

Sec. 16. Any player running the bases is out if at any time he is touched by the ball while in play in the hands of an adversary, without some part of his person being on a base.

Sec. 17. No ace nor base can be made upon a foul ball; such a ball shall be considered dead, and not in play until it shall first have been settled in the hands of the pitcher. In such cases players running bases shall return to them and may be put out in so returning in the same manner as the striker when running to the first base.

Sec. 18. No ace or base can be made when a fair ball has been caught without having touched the ground; such a ball shall be considered alive and in play. In such players running bases shall return to them, and may be put out in so returning, in the same manner as the striker when running to first base; but players, when balls are so caught, may run their bases immediately after the ball has been settled in the hands of the player catching it.

Sec. 19. The striker must stand on a line drawn through the center of the home base, not exceeding in length three feet from either side thereof, and parallel with the line occupied by the pitcher. He shall be considered the striker until he has made the first base. Players must strike in regular rotation, and, after the first innings is played, the turn commences with the player who stands on the list next to the one who lost the third hand.

Sec. 20. Players must make their bases in the order of striking; and when a fair ball is struck, and not caught flying (or on the first bound), the first base must be vacated, as also the second and third bases, if they are occupied at the same time. Players may be put out on any base, under these circumstances, in the same manner as the striker when running to the first base.

Sec. 21. Players running the bases must, so far as possible, keep upon the direct line between the bases; and, must make them in the following order (word deleted): first, second, third, and home, and if returning must reverse this order; and should any player run three feet out of this line for the purpose of avoiding the ball in the hands of an adversary, he shall be declared out.

Sec. 22. Any player, who shall intentionally prevent an adversary from catching or fielding the ball, shall be declared out.

Sec. 23. If the player is prevented from making a base, by the intentional obstruction of an adversary, he shall be entitled to that base, and not be put out.

Sec. 24. If an adversary stops the ball with his hat or cap or takes it from the hands of a party not engaged in the game, no player can be put out unless the ball shall first have been settled in the hands of the pitcher.

Sec. 25. If a ball, from the stroke of a bat, is held under any other circumstances than as enumerated in Section 24d, and without having touched the ground more than once, the striker is out.

Sec. 26. If two hands are already out, no player running home at the time a ball is struck can make an ace if the striker is put out.

Sec. 27. An innings must be concluded at the time the third hand is put out.

Sec. 28. The game shall consist of nine innings to each side, when, should the number of runs be equal, the play shall be continued until a majority of runs, upon an equal number of innings, shall be declared, which shall conclude the game.

Sec. 29. In playing all matches, nine players from each club shall constitute a full field, and they must have been regular members of the club which they represent, and of no other club, for thirty days prior to the match. No change or substitution shall be made after the game has been commenced unless for reason of illness or injury. Position of players and choice of innings shall be determined by captains previously appointed for that purpose by the respective clubs.

Sec. 30. The umpire shall take care that the regulations respecting balls, bats, bases, and the pitcher’s and striker’s positions, are strictly observed. He shall keep a record of the game, in a book prepared for the purpose; he shall be the judge of fair and unfair play, and shall determine all disputes and differences which may occur during the game; he shall take especial care to declare all foul balls and baulks, immediately upon their occurrence, unasked, and in a distinct and audible manner. He shall, in every instance, before leaving the ground, declare the winning club, and shall record his decision in the scorebooks of the two clubs.

Sec. 31. In all matches, the umpire shall be selected by the captains of the respective sides and shall perform all the duties enumerated in section 30, except recording the game, which shall be done by two scorers, one of whom shall be appointed by each of the contending clubs.

Sec. 32. No person engaged in a match, either as umpire, scorer, or player, shall be either directly or indirectly, interested in any bet upon the game. Neither umpire, scorer, nor player shall be changed during a match, unless with the consent of both parties (except for a violation of this law), except as provided in section 29, and then the umpire may dismiss any transgressors.

Sec. 33. The umpire in any match shall determine when play shall be suspended; and if the game can not be concluded, it shall be decided by the last even innings, provided five innings have been played, and the party having the greatest number of runs shall be declared the winner.

Sec. 34. Clubs may adopt such rules respecting balls knocked beyond or outside of the bounds of the field, as the circumstances of the ground may demand; and these rules shall govern all matches played upon the ground, provided that they are distinctly made known to every player and umpire, previous to the commencement of the game.

Sec. 35. No person shall be permitted to approach or to speak with the umpire, scorers, or players, or in any manner to interrupt or interfere during the progress of the game, unless by special request of the umpire.

Sec. 36. No person shall be permitted to act as umpire or scorer in any match unless he shall be a member of a Base-Ball Club governed by these rules.

Sec. 37. Whenever a match shall have been determined upon between two clubs, play shall be called at the exact hour appointed; and should either party fail to produce their players within fifteen minutes thereafter, the party so failing shall admit a defeat.

Sec. 38. No person who shall be in arrears to any other club, or who shall at any time receive compensation for his services as a player, shall be competent to play in any match.

Sec. 39. Should a striker stand at the bat without striking at good balls repeatedly pitched to him, for the apparent purpose of delaying the game, or of giving advantage to a player, the umpire, after warning him, shall call one strike, and if he persists in such action, two and three strikes. When three strikes are called, he shall be subject to the same rules as if he had struck at three fair balls.

Sec. 40. Every match hereafter made shall be decided by a single game, unless otherwise mutually agreed upon by the contesting clubs.

Show the gate staff a picture of this coupon and receive $2.00 off your admission price! Offer good until August 31st Only one coupon per family, please.

Hands-On-History

Children will be given a “Pastport” at the start of their Village trip, which can be stamped at the buildings they visit after completing a take-home craft or activity, like writing with a quill pen, carding wool or churning butter. Other family-friendly activities include games and live entertainment from traditional local musician Mary Roth.
Pastports can be redeemed at the Country Store for a free treat!
This event sponsored by:

To sponsor this event click here

 

Railroad Days

Visitors will find presentations, railroad displays and working model trains from a variety of groups throughout the Village.
To sponsor this event click here
Vendor Registration Form
This event sponsored by:

15th Annual Celtic Weekend

Celebrate all things Irish, Scottish, and Welsh at Historic Cold Spring Village’s 15th Annual Celtic Weekend on July 13-14 from 10am-4:30pm. The weekend features musical entertainment throughout the grounds. Main stage performances will include sets by Nae Breeks Pipes & Drums Band, which is comprised of members of the famed Atlantic City Sandpipers, on Sunday. Joe McGonigle will entertain all weekend long along with world-renowned musician Tom Brett. Mike Dupuy Falconry will be joining us again on Saturday and Sunday. The New Jersey Irish Setter Rescue will beat the event, accompanied by the loveable breed to meet with visitors.
The Celtic nations love their sports and one of the summer team sports they enjoy is the venerable old game of cricket, which is played on a moderate basis throughout Scotland, Ireland, and Wales.
Visitors to this years Celtic Weekend at Historic Cold Spring Village will have an opportunity to personally experience this aspect of Celtic culture by joining in the short, informal, cricket games American cricket player and teacher Tom Melville will be leading that weekend. The games will be run on a continuous walk-up basis and are open to all. Absolutely no experience required! So come and discover what “play ball” means to the Celtic people! Son of Vikings will be vending their wares during the event!  You may recognize some of their pieces from the show “Vikings”! AND This just in…Mary Roth will be performing LIVE along with Elliot Levine and Robert Kenyatta!

   
To sponsor this event click here
Vendor Registration Form

Saturday

12am & 3pm Mike Dupuy Falconry Lecture at Bakery

Throughout the day Joe McGonigle performing

at Friends Pavilion

Throughout the day Tom Brett performing

at the Cold Spring Brewery

11:30am Mary Roth with Elliot Levine and Robert Kenyatta performing at the Welcome Center

1pm & 3pm Mary Roth with Elliot Levine and Robert Kenyatta performing at the Village Gazebo

Sunday

11am & 2pm Mike Dupuy Falconry Lecture at Bakery

11am & 2pm Nae Breeks performs at the Village Gazebo

Throughout the day Joe McGonigle performing

at the Cold Spring Brewery

Throughout the day Tom Brett performing

at the Friends Pavilion

11:30am Mary Roth with Elliot Levine and Robert Kenyatta performing at the Welcome Center

1pm & 3pm Mary Roth with Elliot Levine and Robert Kenyatta performing at the Village Gazebo

Independence Day Celebration

Celebrate all things American at Historic Cold Spring Village’s annual Independence Day Celebration, which will be held on Saturday and Sunday, July 6th and 7th, from 10:00 am to 4:30 pm. A variety of patriotic family activities, programs, and music will be taking place and the Village’s restored historic buildings will be open, featuring demonstrations of Early American trades and crafts.
At 11:30 am on Saturday and Sunday at the Dennisville Inn, there will be a Militia Muster for children ages 5 to 12. This will be followed by a reading of the Declaration of Independence at  12:30 pm.  On Sunday from 2:00 pm to 3:00 pm the John Walter Cape Community Band will perform American heritage tunes at the Friends Pavilion. On Sunday from 2:00 pm to 3:00 pm learn some of the history of the American Flag at the Village Gazebo.  The Family Activity Area will feature children’s historic games, and take-home patriotic crafts including an American flag. Kids can also take part in the “Patriot Spy Game,” visiting Village buildings to look for clues using a real Revolutionary War cipher.

This event sponsored by: VFW Peterson-Little Post No. 386

To sponsor this event click here.
Vendor Registration Form

 

Quilt & Fiber Arts Show

Historic Cold Spring Village is featuring fiber arts at the 28th annual Cape May Quilt and Fiber Show, Saturday and Sunday, June 22-23. Sponsored by CAMACO Quilters Guild, the event will be held from 10am until 4:30pm both days and will feature Viewer’s Choice quilt show, speakers, demonstrations and vendors.

On Saturday, visitors may vote for their favorite quilts in the Welcome Center at the Viewer’s Choice Quilt Show or visit the Cold Spring Brewery the and vote on their favorite entries.  On Sunday continue to enjoy the display and see the winners.

Kathleen Lindsey, a founding member of the Seven Sisters will present a collection of memoirs that depict various experiences in her life symbolizing lifelong stories and events pieced together in an imaginary quilt on Saturday at 11am and 2pm at the Gazebo

Throughout the weekend enjoy dyeing and spinning demonstrations from Erin Lewis. Visit with Chris Ruwell and learn about wagon wheel weaving. Embroiderer’s Guild of American, Jersey Cape Atlantic Chapter, Quilts of Valor, South Shore Stitcher’s and Ryan’s Cases for Smiles will also be demonstrating.

A rare wedding quilt, c. 1714, handmade by Cape May Countian Sarah Spicer, will be on display both Saturday and Sunday. The quilt was restored in 2012 through a grant from the Cape May County Culture and Heritage Commission. A HCSV staff member discusses the restoration process and care of your textiles at home.

Shop for quilting and sewing fabrics, supplies, and equipment to help inspire the creation of an heirloom project with regional vendors.

While here, visit the Country Store, have a snack at the Bakery, indulge your sweet tooth at the Ice Cream Parlor, experience a taste of history at Cold Spring Brewery or enjoy lunch at Cold Spring Grange Restaurant or the Village Eatery.

This event sponsored by: CAMACO Quilters

To sponsor this event click here

29th Annual Cape May Quilt & Fiber Show
Views Choice Quilt Show Winners

Bed Quilt
1. Hydrangea Twist by Lynne Coates
2. Kaffe Squared by Erin Keegan
3. Sunbonnet Quilt by Kate George

Large & Medium Wall Hanging
1. Life Begins in the Garden by Dale Watson
2. Quilting Designs at a Glance by Helen Ernst
3. Batick Compass by Erin Keegan

Small Wall Hangings
1. Renewed Vintage Hankie by Helen Ernst
2. Free Motion with Joyce by Mary Archibald
3. Hangin on the Edge by Jane Pszczolkowski

Best in Show
Wild Thymes by Doris v. McCamy

Historic Cold Spring Village congratulation all the quilters on the wonderful entries!